Using Unison with Android over USB

For some time, I've been happily using Unison in conjunction with my Android phone's USB mass storage function to synchronize files between my phone and my desktop. It was simple: I'd plug in my phone with USB and enable the SD card to be used as a mass storage device, then mount it in Linux and run Unison as if the phone was a local folder (with appropriate tweaks to support the FAT filesystem).

Alas, my phone was getting on in years (or months, as it is in tech), and with support long dropped and capacity nigh exhausted, I had to upgrade. With my new phone I've been promoted to the “new hotness” that is Android 6 Marshmallow, but one of the functions that was dropped along the way was the ability to expose the SD card as mass storage over USB. Admittedly it wasn't a perfect solution, requiring unmounting …

Read this post

On backups/redundancy

Recent events gave me cause to consider my personal data backup and redundancy strategy for my Debian installs. Or, more accurately, it caused me to amend my half-baked and semi-implemented existing approach so that I won't lose data or have to reconfigure things from memory/scratch in the event of a hard disk failure.

My present “backup” approach is really somewhere between a time-limited backup and redundant storage. Essentially, I use Unison to synchronize my home folder (with certain sub-folders ignored, e.g. certain git repositories, config and thumbnail cache folders) between my desktop and my netbook. I have to run Unison manually, so I end up synchronizing my data every week, give or take. This effectively kills two birds with one stone: I get to have local copies of my important data as up-to-date as my last sync for when I'm on the road and using my netbook, and …

Read this post

Copying an existing Linux system to a new hard drive

I recently upgraded my home desktop's hard drive, because the old one was getting a bit full. Googling for instructions about how to transfer an existing system onto a new drive, many posts suggest using the cpio command, and that's what I tried. While this command does the job for the most part, there is one caveat which I encountered that makes cpio not the ideal tool to use.

Don't use cpio to clone filesystems. Why? Because GNU cpio doesn't support access control lists (ACLs) or extended attributes (xattrs).

Using cpio will end up a little screwy in some edge cases because of this. The particular case I ran into involved folders in /media that are managed by udisks2. udisks2 creates personal mount folders under /media with tailored ACLs to help properly manage permissions for permission-capable filesystems mounted by regular users. If you already have one of these personal mount …

Read this post


Page 1 of 1